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The Gomorrah Principle

The Gomorrah Principle - Rick DeStefanis The Gomorrah Principle by Rick DeStefanis is the story of a promise Brady Nash made to his late best friend and step brother, Duff Coleridge. Duff had been killed in Vietnam, though there are things about his death that don't entirely make sense. A letter he had sent home is evidence of the wrong doings that have been happening in Vietnam. Enlisting means alienating Lacey, his lover, but Brady wants to get to the bottom of what had happened with Duff's death, even if it means the love of his life never speaking to him again.

The characters are very relatable and I can certainly understand the motivation behind all of their actions. Brady Nash, firstly, is an interesting character and I do like how he feels like he needs to find out the truth about what had happened, despite not needing to (he could have thrown the documents away or stored them and done nothing about it). One of the things I liked most, with Brady's talent for sharp shooting, that he was fairly modest and didn't brag much about it. As for Lacey, I felt that she was a strong woman and appreciated her tenacity in both her career and later involvement in the espionage plot. My favourite character overall was Jack Maxon; it was good to have his outlook on the situations. I liked that he was fearful of Brady's investigation, but he still remained smart about matters and confident within the situations presented. Though, having said that, I kind of felt like he was getting stupider as time progressed and it sort of seemed like the author no longer had any idea where to lead the character; the threats Maxon was making seemed unnecessary and the violence toward others seemed somewhat random rather than the intelligent thought process we had seen prior. I did feel like his later actions weren't as intelligible as his earlier ones and he ultimately led his own downfall. Other than those main characters, I think that many of the background characters were strongly written as well. Though, I would have enjoyed some more contact with some of them; many of them just dwindle into the background and some of those minor plots do not get resolved. For example, I don't think that Hubert Brister's story got properly told and we never really got much of an explanation as to what happened to him in the end. The same with Lynn Dai Bouchet; I just don't feel like we got a full explanation as to her role in all of the mess that went on, and even the goings on between her and Duff.

I really liked the beginning of the book; it's like a little enticing snippet of what is to come and it also introduces us to Brady's idea of "The Gomorrah Principle". The death of his friend was sad, but also a fairly interesting beginning to the mystery. Though, I did feel like later on in the book, the mystery portion was completely gone. I feel this because as soon as we meet him, it's kind of obvious as to who is responsible for Duff's death. Though, I think the book was more reliant on the adventure aspect rather than that of mystery; we get to read the thrills of war and even the espionage that goes on as well. I particularly liked the side story of Lacey's music career, but felt that the ending of that was a little bit insubstantial, just because after a point, it just sort of ends. I think that the book was fairly well written. The author has a good grasp on word usage and explanations to create interest and mystery. I also like the way they use descriptions to create realistic scenes. Being that I'm not particularly knowledgeable in many aspects of military, I found that I didn't understand every reference. However, it was good that the author had a simple glossary at the back which did help with some things.

Overall, I think that the Rick DeStefanis has written a great book; the perspectives from many characters provide us with an interesting scene of war and mystery. There are times when I felt the book lacked certain elements, like fulfilled plot lines for some characters and proper explanations for some events. However, overall, I think it is worth five stars; I really enjoyed the book.

I received a free eCopy in exchange for an honest review.